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TOMATO-BRAISED ABALONE WITH FARINATA

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TOMATO-BRAISED ABALONE WITH FARINATA

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Ingredients

Adjust Servings:
Farinata
225 grams chickpea flour 2 cups
1000 grams lukewarm water
4 grams Garlic
15 grams extra virgin olive oil (1 tablespoon) plus more for frying
2 teaspoons Kosher Salt 7 grams
5 turns of black pepper
1 gram chopped rosemary
Tomato- Braised Abalone
907 grams red abalone in the shell 2 pounds (about 10)
extra virgin olive oil
Kosher Salt
280 grams yellow onion (1) thinly sliced
12 grams Garlic
pinch dried red pepper flakes
226 grams White Wine
454 grams white stock
397 grams canned cherry tomatoes
3 tablespoons capers rinsed well
3 white anchovies minced
10-12 pitted black olives sliced
Extra Virgin Oil
wondra flour for dusting
handful chervil sprigs
1 lemon
2 tablespoons dried black Gaeta olives crumbled
Cuisine:
  • Serves 4
  • Medium

Ingredients

  • Farinata

  • Tomato- Braised Abalone

Directions

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  1. To make the farinata:Lightly coat two 9 by 13-inch baking pans or rimmed baking sheets with nonstick spray. In a blender, purée the chickpea flour and water. Pour the batter into a large, heavy-bottomed pot and place over medium heat. Whisk in the garlic, olive oil, salt, and pepper and continue to cook, whisking constantly, until thickened to a paste, about 15 minutes. Stir in the rosemary, then pour the batter evenly into the prepared pans. Tap the pan lightly against the counter to level, then refrigerate, uncovered, until set, at least 2 hours.
  2. Prepare the abalone:Preheat the oven to 325°F. Using a large palette knife or kitchen spoon, pry underneath the foot of the abalone muscle to dislodge it from the shell. Trim away the innards and rinse clean.
  3. Heat a film of olive oil in a heavy-bottomed pot over medium heat. Season the abalone with salt and sear until lightly browned on both sides, then transfer to a plate.
  4. Wipe the pot clean, heat a thin film of olive oil over medium-low heat, and stir in the onions and a pinch of salt. Sweat for 2 minutes, then add the garlic and sweat until the garlic has softened, about 1 minute. Sprinkle the red pepper flakes into the pot, deglaze with the wine, and bring the pot to a simmer. Pour in the stock and tomatoes, return to a simmer, and stir the abalone.
  5. Cover the pot, transfer to the oven, and braise for 25 minutes to 1½ hours or until the abalone slide off a skewer when pierced. Uncover the pot and let cool for 20 minutes. Fish out the abalone pieces and slice crosswire into thin strips. Return the slices to the braise, then bring the pot to a low simmer and stir in the capers, anchovies, and sliced olives. Turn off the heat and keep warm.
  6. Now finish the farinata.With a 3-inch cutter, punch the chilled farinata into rounds, cutting as close as possible to limit the amount of trimmings remaining: you will need 12 rounds. Blot the rounds dry between paper towels.
  7. In a large sauté pan with straight sides or cast-iron skillet, heat ½ inch of olive oil over medium-high heat. Dust the farinata rounds in Wondra flour, shaking off any excess. In batches to avoid crowding the pan, sear the rounds until golden brown on both sides, then drain the paper towels
  8. To serve, place the farinata disks in bowls. Divide the abalone pieces evenly among the bowls and spoon some braising liquid over the top. Grate lemon zest over each bowl. Slice the lemon in half, then squeeze a few drops of lemon juice into each bowl. Garnish with a drizzle of olive oil, a few sprigs of chervil, and a sprinkling of dehydrated olives. Serve with the remaining farinata.
  • *Chef’s note: I’ve adapted the recipe for a modern kitchen, cooking it in a pot, pouring it into a pan to set before punching out disks and crisping them in a pan. Instead of abalone, you can use squid or octopus in this recipe. Because the weight provided for the abalone in this recipe includes the shell, use half the weight for squid or octopus.

Reprinted with permission from SPQR: Modern Italian Food and Wine, by Shelley Lindgren and Matthew Accarrino with Kate Leahy (Ten Speed Press, 2012)Photography copyright 2012 by Sara Remington

Matthew Accarrino

Matthew Accarrino is the nationally recognized chef of SPQR in San Francisco, CA. Born in the Midwest and raised on the east coast, he moved west to California in 2007. His unique culinary style draws inspiration from his Italian heritage, personal experiences, and classical training with some of America’s best chefs, coupled with his embrace of the bounty of opportunities that California ingredients present. With a strong belief in direct sourcing, Accarrino endeavors to play a role in the growing and development of many of his ingredients. The result is an intensely personal cuisine that is both technically polished and soulful; and which has garnered praise from publications such as Food & Wine, Bon Appétit, Saveur, San Francisco Chronicle, 7X7 and San Francisco magazine. Under his direction, the restaurant was recognized with a Michelin star in the 2013, 2014, 2015 and 2016 guides. Accarrino has been nominated four times by the James Beard Foundation for “Best Chef: West.” FOOD & WINE named him a “Best New Chef” in 2014 and FOOD & WINE readers named him a “People’s Best Chef California” in 2013. Accarrino co-authored and released his first book, published by Ten Speed Press, SPQR: Modern Italian Food and Wine, in October 2012.

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