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LEMON TART – ITALIAN LEAFY LEMONS WITH CRÈME FRAICHE

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LEMON TART – ITALIAN LEAFY LEMONS WITH CRÈME FRAICHE

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Ingredients

Adjust Servings:
Sweet Pastry
500 grams Flour
300 grams unsalted butter softened
200 grams icing sugar
4 Egg Yolks or 80g in weight
Lemon Filling
8 Eggs
500 grams Caster Sugar
140 grams unsalted butter melted and kept warm
10 leafy lemons juiced
6 Lemon Zest
  • Serves 8
  • Medium

Ingredients

  • Sweet Pastry

  • Lemon Filling

Directions

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PastryNote: The pastry component of this recipe makes enough for 2 tarts

  1. Rub the butter and flour together until you have fine breadcrumbs.
  2. Mix the egg yolks with the icing sugar and then add to the flour and butter.
  3. Mix and bring together but do not overwork.
  4. Rest for one hour in the fridge.
  5. Grease and lightly flour a 28cm x 2.5cm plain flan ring and place on a rubberised mat or silicone paper, ensure you have a heavy flat baking tray to cook the tart on.
  6. Roll out the pastry to a thickness of 3mm and then line the mould carefully pushing the pastry into the corners.
  7. Line the tart with parchment paper or heavy duty cling film before filling with baking beans.
  8. Chill for at least one hour.
  9. Once rested bake at 180˚c or until golden, remove the beans and return to the oven for the base to finish cooking.
  10. Seal the pastry by brushing with egg yolk, place back in the oven to cook the egg.

Filling

  1. Gently heat the lemon juice with the sugar and zest, whisk onto the eggs and add the melted butter.
  2. Mix well and then strain through a muslin cloth.
  3. Carefully pour into the pastry case and then bake at 140˚c until set.
  4. Allow to cool.

To Serve

  1. Slice the tart into 8 and then dust with icing sugar.
  2. Caramelize using a blowtorch and serve with a quenelle of crème fraiche.

Robert Thompson

The UK has seen the rise of culinary experts over the last 10 years, spawning dozens of Michelin chefs and television talent, all as innovative but realistic as some of the best business entrepreneurs. Since 2002, when Robert Thompson retained a second Michelin Star under Germain and Annie Schwab at Winteringham Fields, he opened the doors of this chic, new world of the culinary art and it was clear that he was typical of this new wave of chefs when he became the country’s youngest Michelin starred chef in 2006.

Inspired to cook by brother Patrick, he acquired a love of cooking at 10 years old and dreamed of owning his own restaurant one day. His most memorable food memory was when he visited the city of Paris with his brother, they ate at the Guy Savoy and Ducasse trying the tasting menus and eating too much but the thrill of dining and the love of fine foods became his great desire.

After Winteringham Fields Robert has worked diligently, taking leading roles at Cliveden and on the Isle of Wight where he was awarded a coveted Michelin Star within the first year at The Hambrough in 2009 which he held for 3 consecutive years. During this period he took on the role of Food Ambassador for the Isle of Wight.

The Independent’s Tracey MacLeod describes Thompson’s style as ‘classic-with-a-twist’. Pan-fried scallops with cauliflower ‘cous-cous’, Ras el Hanout and coriander shoots shared space on a recent tasting menu with a pressing of smoked eel, pork belly, foie gras and Granny Smith apple.

To date, his distinctive and committed approach has been in the employment of others, including the recent stint at Yarmouth’s The George.

Now, at the age of 33, he has decided to go solo. Robert Thompson’s style has always been a congenial one: his menus have remained brief and to the point, his style of cooking respectful of the old classics, yet mindful of a modern dining trend that values, above all, lightness and freshness.

He rarely serves anything that’s too tricky or trendy, only serving dishes that you can imagine he would enjoy eating himself. And for once, here’s a modern chef who hasn’t hopped on the Provençal-French bandwagon simply for the sake of trendiness – he is his own man. For instance, he always looks no further than the producers outside his front door and will continue to be an ambassador for Island food.

Portrait by: David Griffen

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